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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 186-187  

Family history of autoimmunity and endocrine disorders in patients with alopecia areata. A Greek study


Department of Dermatology, Thriassio General Hospital, Athens, Greece

Date of Submission10-Dec-2021
Date of Acceptance14-Jun-2022
Date of Web Publication7-Oct-2022

Correspondence Address:
Eleni Klimi
Department of Dermatology, Thriassio General Hospital, Avenue Gennimata, Po. 19200, Magula, Athens
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijt.ijt_120_21

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How to cite this article:
Klimi E. Family history of autoimmunity and endocrine disorders in patients with alopecia areata. A Greek study. Int J Trichol 2022;14:186-7

How to cite this URL:
Klimi E. Family history of autoimmunity and endocrine disorders in patients with alopecia areata. A Greek study. Int J Trichol [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Nov 28];14:186-7. Available from: https://www.ijtrichology.com/text.asp?2022/14/5/186/358099



Sir,

Alopecia areata is a nonscarring hair loss of autoimmune origin affecting 2% of the general population. Several studies have detected autoimmune disorders in the family history of patients with alopecia areata.[1] This study aims to find the prevalence of autoimmune and endocrine disorders in the family history of males and female patients with alopecia areata and to compare it with the prevalence of these disorders in the general population. Patients above 18 years of age were included in the study.Family history was taken by the consulting physician at the time of the first consultation by completing a prepared questionnaire. Thirty-three males and thirty-one females were diagnosed with alopecia areata, all presented patchy alopecia. The prevalence of alopecia areata in the family members of females was 16.12%, (5 cases), 12.12% for the males (4 cases), which is statistically significant higher than this of the general population-2.1%[1] P < 0.0001 in both groups [Table 1]. The prevalence of psoriasis in the family members of females is 6.45% (2 cases) and of the males 6.6% (2.cases), which is statistically significant greater than this of the general population-2%,[2] P < 0.021, P < 0.017, respectively, [Table 1]. The prevalence of hypothyroidism it was not possible from the collected data to determine whether it was of autoimmune origin or not is 9.6% (3 cases), in the family members of females not statistically significant P < 0.111 and in the males 15.15% (5 cases) statistically significant higher than this of the general population-5%.[3] The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis was 12.9% (4 cases), in the family members of females, 3.63% (1 case), for males which is statistically significant higher than this of the general population-0.68%[4]P < 0001, P < 0.015, respectively. The prevalence of atopic eczema in the family members of females is 12.9% (4 cases) and of males 9.10% (3 cases), was not statistically significant higher than this of the general population-10.2,[1] P < 0.492, P < 0777, respectively. As shown in [Table 1], the prevalence of diabetes insulin dependent - no cases reported - was not statistically significant higher than this of the general population - 0.24%[5] in both groups. As shown in [Table 1], limitation is the small number of the patients in this study. However, it demonstrates that the prevalence of atopic eczema and of diabetes insulin dependent regardless of gender was not statistically significant different from this in the general population. It also reveals regardless of gender statistically significant increased prevalence of alopecia areata, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis in the family members of patients with alopecia areata, suggesting a common immunopathogenic mechanism linked to the pathogenesis of these three disorders. Family history should be taken with caution by the examining physician to detect autoimmunity in the family history of patients with alopecia areata. In addition, larger studies are needed to investigate the impact of parental autoimmunity to the development of alopecia areata in the offspring.
Table 1: Comparison of percentages between groups

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Financial support and sponsorship

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Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Agre K, McCarthy P, Bemmels H, Wiens K, LeRoy BS, Hordinsky M. Familial implications of autoimmune disease: Recurrence risks of alopecia areata and associated conditions in first-degree relatives. Gen Couns 2020;29:35-43.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Fotiadou C, Lazaridou E, Ioannides D. Management of psoriasis in adolescence. Adolesc Health Med Ther 2014;5:25-34.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Chiovato L, Magri F, Carle A. Hypothyroidism in context: Where we've been and where we're going. Adv Ther 2019;36 Suppl 2:47-58.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Adrianakos A, Trontzas P, Christoyannis F, Kaskani E, Nikolia Z, Tavaniotou E, et al. Prevalence and management of rheumatoid arthritis in the general population of Greece-the ESORDIG study. Rheumatology (Oxford) 2006;45:1549-54.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Liatis S, Dafoulas GE, Kani C, Politi A, Litsa P, Sfikakis PP, et al. The prevalence and treatment patterns of diabetes in the Greek population based on real-world data from the nation-wide prescription database. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2016;118:162-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    



 
 
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