International Journal of Trichology International Journal of Trichology
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 177-180

Three cases of hair loss analyzed by the point of view of the analytical psychology


1 Department of Clinical Psychology, Pontifícia universidade Católica de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
2 Department of Aesthetics in Dermatology, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul, Santa Cruz do Sul, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Ademir Carvalho Leite Júnior
Av Imperatriz Leopoldina, 957-Conjunto 2009, São Paulo 5305-011
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijt.ijt_106_16

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Psychotrichology is the science, which covers the psychosomatics applied to hair problems, i.e., body-psyche phenomena involving scalp and hair disorders. The approaches involving psychotricology are varied and may include psychiatric,[1] psychoanalytical,[2],[3] and those involving knowledge related to analytical psychology.[4] An analysis from the analytical psychology point of view, a theory developed by the physician Carl Gustav Jung, favors a symbolic view to the disease, providing it attributions and meanings that go beyond those related to physical body signs and symptoms only. This paper aims to describe and analyze, under the analytical psychology view, three cases the psychic and clinical demonstrations of which relate to symbolic and historic aspects concerning life of patients as possibilities of cause and maintenance of hair problems. The first of them is related to an 8-year-old girl who witnessed a scene of physical aggression by her father against her mother and developed a case of total alopecia. The second case is related to a 43-year-old woman who developed self-inflicted scalp dermatitis due to severe anxiety; and at last, the case of a telogen effluvium in a 23-year-old woman who developed hyperprolactinemia after the death of her mother, having to substitute her in the care about her husband and brothers. Looking at the clinical history and symbolic matters of scalp and hair diseases enabled, in the aforementioned cases, a better understanding of patients' psychoemotional disorders that may be related to the beginning and maintenance of clinical cases presented by them.


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