International Journal of Trichology International Journal of Trichology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 246-250

Hirsutism: A Clinico-investigative Study


1 Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, Dr. RML Hospital and PGIMER, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Endocrinology, Dr. RML Hospital and PGIMER, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Radiology, Dr. RML Hospital and PGIMER, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi, India
4 Department of Biochemistry, Dr. RML Hospital and PGIMER, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Ram Krishan Gautam
Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, Dr. RML Hospital and PGIMER, Baba Kharak Singh Marg, New Delhi - 110 001
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-7753.111204

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Background: Hirsutism is a common clinical condition characterized by presence of terminal hair at body sites under androgenic influence. Inspite of the significant worldwide prevalence of hirsutism, studies on hirsutism from India are not many. Objective: To assess the etiology of hirsutism and correlate its severity with underlying causes and various hormone levels. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 40 patients of hirsutism enrolled on first come basis were included. All patients underwent detailed clinical assessment and transabdominal ultrasonography. Free and total testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, prolactin, free tri-iodothyronine, free tetra-iodothyronine, and thyroid stimulating hormone, and sex hormone binding globulin were estimated. Forty age-matched controls without features of hyperandrogenemia were included for the comparison. Results: Thirteen (32.5%) patients had mild, 52.5% had moderate whereas 15% had severe hirsutism. Positive family history was documented in 42.5% patients. The clinical features found to be associated with hirsutism included acne (55%), menstrual irregularities (40%), acanthosis nigricans (37.5%), obesity (37.5%), and androgenetic alopecia in 27.5% of patients. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) was the underlying cause in 70%, non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hypothyroidism in 7.5% each whereas idiopathic hirsutism was found in 15% patients. Conclusion: PCOS was the most common cause of hirsutism found in the instant study. Further, there was positive correlation between severity of hirsutism and free testosterone levels.


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